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Alan's Garden Blog

Compost: A race against time

Posted by Alan Singleton on

Their is a ton of science behind quick composting but I am not one to be out there with a thermometer in the middle of the night. I have been a bit slack and just cranked up my volume of compost for the big garlic planting in a couple of weeks. If the compost is not ready it will take nitrogen away from the garlic in the early stages which is not a good thing.

I already had about 1/4 of a metre of half done compost:

 

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Special: colour for the price of zinc

Posted by Alan Singleton on

I have some surplus colours that you can have for the price of zinc. One small (1200mm x 600mm) in Cottage Green and Wilderness and one large in Classic Cream.

 

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What to plant in March

Posted by Alan Singleton on

There are still plenty of veges to grow in now: cabbage, carrots, lettuce, chinese veges, onions, peas, shallots and silverbeet to name a few. I’m sticking with what works for me, spring onions (they grow quicker and have a better yield than schollots), chinese cabbage, carrots, chinese veges (still a fast grower), snow peas and silverbeet. I have already planted some ‘green manure’ in about one third of my garden area which will be ready to dig in for planting August/September. I will be taking out my sixty odd garlic then as well and plan to plant a heap of spuds and ginger. Fresh ginger from your own garden is just the best.

 

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The all-new Pop-Up Garden

Posted by Alan Singleton on

After months of trial and error I have finally come up with a garden that suits both the keen garden and amateur that just wants garden fresh veges without the mucking about.

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Watersaver Gardens fair well in the wet

Posted by Alan Singleton on

One of the weird advantages of these gardens is they just don’t get waterlogged. They have vents so flooding rain first fills up the reservoir for free and then the rest drains away.

Now I am not saying my plants don’t suffer, but nowhere near as much as in a conventional garden and they recover much more quickly as you can see below. I thought I had lost everything in this garden (another experimental one) but it recovered!

 

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